Sculpture Garden

Join us on the bay . . .

The Inevitable Question, The Lure of Simple Inclinations, and The False Shadow of Transformation
Danville Chadbourne
The Inevitable Question, The Lure of Simple Inclinations, and The False Shadow of Transformation
Walking White Flower
James Surls
Walking White Flower
Into the Wind
Jane DeDecker
Into the Wind
Off Port Bow
Sandy Scott
Off Port Bow
Days
Mark Williamson
Days
Uccelli (Birds of St. Francis)
Charles Umlauf
Uccelli (Birds of St. Francis)
Return of Ancient Wisdom
Leo E. Osborne
Return of Ancient Wisdom
Rites of Spring
Kent Ullberg
Rites of Spring
Lighthouse Fountain
Jesus Bautista Moroles
Lighthouse Fountain
Spirit Columns
Jesus Bautista Moroles
Spirit Columns
Interlocking
Jesus Bautista Moroles
Interlocking
Man's Best Friend
Michael Atkinson
Man's Best Friend
The Inevitable Question, The Lure of Simple Inclinations, and The False Shadow of Transformation
The Inevitable Question, The Lure of Simple Inclinations, and The False Shadow of Transformation, 2016
Dimensions: 8 feet x 17 feet x 11 feet
Other Information:

Known for his craftsmanship and use of primal materials such as wood and clay, Chadbourne's work is often likened to a body of cultural artifacts. The visual and ritual impact of these beautiful objects is made more complex by their provocative,poetic and often paradoxical titles. They are, in essence, monuments to irrational ideas and human impulses.

Born in Bryan, Texas in 1949, Chadbourne received a BFA in 1971 from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas and an MFA in 1973 from Texas Tech University in Lubbock. After many years teaching studio art and art history at the college level, Chadbourne quit in 1989 to devote himself full-time to his work.He has exhibited extensively, including more than 100 one-person exhibitions. He resides in San Antonio with his wife Diana Roberts also an important figure in the art world.

The process to procure the sculptures started in 2015 in consultation with the artist and the family of James A. Smallenberger, whose contribution made this acquisition possible. The three large-scale, high-fired ceramic works complement the building and the seaside setting of the Art Center’s growing collection of outdoor works by important Texas sculptors such as James Surls, Kent Ullberg,and Rockport’s own Jesús Moroles.

The three Chadbourne’s signature ceramic works form an almost ritual grouping outside, emphasizing the artist’s interest in natural materials, bold use of color, and evocative forms. 

Chadbourne often describes his large sculptural forms as “monuments to abstract, even irrational, impulses.”Entitled The Inevitable Question, The Lure of Simple Inclinations, and The False Shadow of Transformation, the sculptures are representative of the artist’s artistic vision.  The largest work is over 8 feet tall, the other two pieces measure over 6 feet.
Walking White Flower
Walking White Flower
Other Information:

American sculptor James Surls

James Surls's work can be seen throughout Texas and is part of the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum (Washington, DC), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York, NY), Whitney Museum of American Art (New York, NY) among many others.

Surls' has strong Texas roots--himself an East Texas native who graduated from Sam Houston State Teachers College in 1966 and then becoming a professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas ('69-76). Surls is very fond of Rockport--having made many trips in the past, to fish, and to visit his good friend and colleague Jesús Moroles. Surls now lives and works in Roaring Fork Valley, Colorado.

After months of preparation and planning, the powdered coated steel piece finally made its way to Rockport. While the piece, called Walking White Flower, bears a striking resemblance to his other molecular-related work seen at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston and the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway in Boston, Walking White Flower is currently the only white piece Surls has made. Its chosen placement--on the lawn of the Rockport Center of the Arts--allows the unique, abstract qualities of the piece to be truly appreciated by visitors to the Art Center.

In November, Surls visited the Art Center to usher in the project. Click below to watch a short video made during the artist's visit.

The project was made possible by The Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston, The Madison Charitable Foundation, and the studio of Jesús Moroles.

Into the Wind
Into the Wind, 2011
Other Information: Jane DeDecker's bronze sculpture Into the Wind arrived April 2, 2011 and was placed on a newly landscaped portion of RCA's Sculpture Garden. The piece was made possible by The Margaret Sue Rust Foundation in Memory of Monroe Rust. Facing the prevailing southeast wind, a lone figure is perched on the bow of a boat - evoking a sense of wonder, sensitivity and pride. The figure brings to mind embarking on a personal journey -- which is innately human and especially true for the many artists that visit the Art Center.

DeDecker is a widely acclaimed artist with a long list of awards and permanent installations all over the nation. Her influences include Kent Ullberg, whose "Rites of Spring" was the first major sculpture dedicated in RCA's garden in 2000. Ullberg's continued interest in shaping the garden contributed greatly to this project being realized.

The Art Center wishes to thank The Margaret Sue Rust Foundation for their continued vision and support of a lasting, meaningful landscape, the Sculpture Garden Committee, and to the many members and volunteers who dedicate their time to this effort. 

For more information on Jane DeDecker, visit www.janededecker.com
Press Release from the Dedication of Into the Wind below.

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Off Port Bow
Off Port Bow, 2009
Other Information: On November 14, 2009, Sandy Scott's "Off Port Bow," a bronze sculpture of three dolphins, was dedicated in Rockport Center for the Arts' Sculpture Garden. In honor of the late Lola L. Bonner, the sculpture was made possible by the Margaret Sue Rust Foundation.

Dolphins 008_WEB



Click the link below for more information.
Days
Days
Other Information: Donated by the artist in 2009, Mark P. Williamson and family grew up around Rockport. Williamson’s works have been accepted into more than 20 national juried art competitions since 2002, receiving awards in Denver, Sacramento, and San Angelo. 

Williamson perfected his marble sculpting techniques while in residence in Pietrasanta, Italy in 1991, later studying under the Spanish abstract sculptor Xavier Corbero (2001) and Jesus Moroles (2005). While focused primarily on marble and granite, Williamson’s work often displays healthy experimentation in the use of other non-traditional media.

Williamson’s sculptures now sit in the collections of prominent art patrons, Highland Park Township (Dallas), at the University of Texas at Austin, and as part of the Rockport Center for the Arts' Permanent Collection.

For more information, please visit http://www.sculptormarkpwilliamson.com.


MarkWilliamson

Uccelli (Birds of St. Francis)
Charles Umlauf  (1911-1994)
Uccelli (Birds of St. Francis), 1972
Other Information: Uccelli (Birds of St. Francis) is a rare casting by the late American sculptor Charles Umlauf. A nationally acclaimed sculptor, Umlauf did many of his castings in Italy (hence the Italian titles), and this piece was part of a full-scale figure casting of St. Francis. Umlauf made only a few castings of the birds by themselves.

Umlauf's work is in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C., the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, and the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Umlauf taught at the University of Texas for over 30 years. The Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Museum in Austin now holds much of Umlauf's remaining works and archives.

This piece was donated by Cam Leonard, a founding father of the Art Center's Sculpture Garden and past-president of the Art Association. Cam and Virginia Leonard's past contributions have made a substantial impact on the Art Center we know today, and Cam's current contribution of Umlauf's Uccelli is dedicated to the memory of Virginia Leonard.

The base for Uccelli was designed by internationally acclaimed sculptor Jesus Moroles, a longtime friend of the Leonards, whose Lighthouse Fountain was dedicated into the Sculpture Garden in 2002.

The dedication for Charles Umlauf's Uccelli took place on November 1, 2008, with Cam Leonard, Jesus Moroles, and Harold Phenix in attendance.

Umlauf Unveil_Web
Artist Jesus Moroles, who designed and installed the base and Visual
Arts Director John Aasp unveil Umlauf's "Uccelli."
Return of Ancient Wisdom
Return of Ancient Wisdom, 2008
Dimensions: 4" x 5", approx
Other Information: The first sculpture since 2002 to be added to Rockport Center for the Arts' Sculpture Garden is "Return of Ancient Wisdom" - a bronze cast from burl wood by nationally acclaimed sculptor Leo E. Osborne. Osborne's piece will be a welcome addition, as the Kemp's ridley sea turtle is of global and local significance. "Return of Ancient Wisdom" evokes the potential of art to raise awareness of our natural environment, and will be a permanent reminder of the ecological role of the Coastal Bend region.

The Art Center's newest sculpture is made possible by the generosity of the Thomas W. Moore family and the Margaret Sue Rust Foundation.

WisdomDedc6

About the Ridley Turtle:

Padre Island National Seashore
is the most important nesting beach in the U.S. for the Kemp's ridley,the most endangered sea turtle in the world. The National Seashore has been a participant in a bi-national, multi-agency effort to save the Kemp's ridley sea turtle since 1978.

The park also participates in global efforts to recover the populations of four other threatened and endangered sea turtle species. In cooperation with several partners, the park conducts an extensive program to detect nesting by Kemp's ridleys and other sea turtles. Staff and volunteers, up to 140 per year, patrol North Padre Island repeatedly each day searching for daytime nesting ridleys to protect the nesting turtles and their eggs.


About the Artist, Leo Osborne:


Living on the Pacific Coast with its wonderful vistas and horizons, Leo E.Osborne creates in painting and bronze using the inspiration of nature and color predominant to the Pacific Northwest.

Osborne’s early training at New England School of Art in Boston, under the direction of painters from the Gloucester and Boston schools of painting gave him the understanding of paint as expressed by the American Impressionists. His living for 20 years in the Mid-coast of Maine furthered his development in the atmospheric paintings with fog, mist and cloudy skies. These coastal experiences equally influenced his sculpture, transpired through the animals depicted and the lyrical moods they express.

Exhibitions of his paintings and sculptures have been held locally and internationally over the last 30 years. He has received eight awards of excellence from the Society of Animal Artists and numerous other awards, including the silver medal from the National Sculpture Society. He has been invited for twelve years to exhibit at the prestigious Birds in Art exhibition at the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum and his work is in private, corporate and museum collections.
Rites of Spring
Rites of Spring, 2000
Dimensions: 12.5' High - 20' Wide
Other Information:

Sunday, September 24, 2000 was the grand opening of Rockport Center for the Arts' Sculpture Garden.  A celebration was held to toast Kent Ullberg and Margaret Sue Rust.  Ullberg, the world's foremost sculptor of wildlife monuments, was commissioned to sculpt the first of 10 works that are to stand in the Sculpture Garden to the south of the Center.  Rust, a Rockport philanthropist, made a major contribution to make this first accomplishment possible.  Ullberg, Swedish born, makes his home on Padre Island.  He has been awarded high honors by such prestigious institutions as the New York City-based National Academy, the oldest fine arts academy in America.  World renowned naturalist Robert Tory Peterson noted "Kent's public monuments have come to symbolize an age of environmental awareness that is a stepping stone to the next millennium". 

Kent Ullberg (2000)   "I wanted this to be an ecological discovery fountain, so I have woven ecological features important to the cranes into the design of the base.  It's divided into two sides symbolizing two important biotopes:  the saltwater-tidal zone right here in our bays, and the wet-grassland at their breeding grounds in the Canadian artic, with their representative families of food-animals.  Some are well hidden, intended to be discovered, maybe after many viewings, sort of a "fun" ecology experience, especially for children.  I invite you to look and see what you can find."

Photo by Ray Owens

Lighthouse Fountain
Lighthouse Fountain, 2002
Dimensions: 21' Tall
Other Information:

In Lighthouse Fountain Moroles has immortalized the spirit of comforting strength, powerful gentleness, and graceful beauty which make the Live Oak Peninsula distinctive.  The representative work of Moroles' signature Fredricksburg granite stands twenty one fee high and symbolizes a lighthouse as water quietly slips down its grooved and curved sides. 

The commission of the Moroles piece is made possible by a major donation from Frances Brockett of Louisiana and a grant from The Brown Foundation of Houston.  Additional members of the Rockport community made valuable contributions to make this artwork become a reality.

Spirit Columns
Spirit Columns
Other Information: Dedicated in 1998, Spirit Columns was the first piece of public art to be installed in Rockport. National Medal of Arts recipient and Rockport resident Jesus Moroles donated the labor, and funds were put up by Bill and Jane Mann along with other community members to make this project happen.

Spirit Columns sits on the southern shore of Little Bay within walking distance of the Art Center.

Read the story from the Corpus Christi Caller-Times here:
http://www.caller2.com/newsarch/news11071.html


photo by Pamela Fulcher
Interlocking
Interlocking
Other Information: Interlocking is an early granite sculpture from National Medal of Arts Award Recipient and Rockport resident Jesus Moroles. The piece was donated to Rockport Center for the Arts in 1991 by Mr. and Mrs. Paul Karcher of Midland. Moroles recently relocated the piece from the front lawn to the Sculpture Garden with a new granite base. 
Man's Best Friend
Man's Best Friend, 1999
Other Information:

This figurative bronze was donated by the artist in memory of his father, Atmar Atkinson, who passed away in 1999. The full-size sculpture sits at the Northwest corner of the Art Center grounds, facing Rockport Harbor and the Texas Maritime Museum. It depicts a young man sitting on a bench with two terriers that are similar to the dogs his father loved so much.

Michael Atkinson is well known for his watercolors and figurative sculpture, and is represented by Galerie Zuger in Santa Fe, NM.

By clicking on each image you will discover details about the artist and the individual sculpture.